Basic Pool Maintenance in Perth Conditions

Monthly Pool Maintenance

Having a pool isn't much like going to one, is it? Instead of constant lounging poolside with an umbrella in your drink, you've suddenly found yourself with nine contractors to compare and contrast and a pool that's turned green because the pump and filter are broken. It need not be this way, however, if you know and practice the basics of monthly pool maintenance. You can keep the repairman away and save a bundle just by making sure you apply these few simple steps.

Obvious Maintenance

There's some maintenance that may be obvious, and is done more on an as-needed basis than strictly monthly. This includes skimming the surface of the pool with a net to remove any floating debris. Just do this whenever you find too many leaves in your water for comfort. If the leaves and debris get too bad, consider checking the surrounding area for overhanging branches or nearby trees. Trim these back every month to limit the amount of time you spend skimming your pool.

Pool Vacuum

You'll want to drain and check your pool vacuum monthly, as well. Take it out of the water and let all the water drain out of it. Check your manufacturer's instructions for a point-by-point breakdown on what to check in the vacuum. Once you've ensured that the vacuum is working properly and no parts require immediate attention, use the attached hose to refill the vacuum with water before attaching it to the skimmer and returning it to the water.

Pool Chemistry

You'll want to test and correct your pool's chemistry at least monthly, but more likely weekly. This involves using a pH testing kit, available at your local pool merchant, as well as checking for alkalinity, metals, algae, and many other toxins and contaminants. Your pool merchant will have the corrective chemicals you can use to fix your pool's chemistry if it falls out of whack. That way, you never wake up to a murky, alkaline pool or a melting acidic one.

Filter

Your filter does exactly what its name implies: it filters the pool water continuously to prevent debris buildup in the water. However, this does mean that debris tends to build up inside the filter. You'll need to regularly backwash your filter (unless you use a cartridge system, which is a much simpler process). This means you'll have to reconnect the incoming line on your pool to a 'waste' line that your pool installer will have set up. Reverse the pump so that water flows into the pump and pushes the debris into the waste line. If you have a sand filter, this will be a long and much more difficult process than if you use a diatomaceous earth (DE) filter. Cartridge filters need only have their cartridges changed, approximately monthly, though more if your pool is especially dirty or frequently used. If you use a DE filter, your waste line will be primarily full of a claylike material composed of the bodies of small dead organisms. Your dirt bag, attached to the waste line, will eventually fill and need to be replaced, though you need worry about this only every few years.

Conclusion

A pool's maintenance can get expensive and overwhelming quick. That's why it's so much easier to simply do the maintenance ahead of time and not have to worry about your constantly-broken pool. Too many people let these small things slide only to find they've piled up into one giant thing which must now be solved with a call to the contractor or pool company to come fix whatever catastrophe has befallen your poor unloved pool in your absence. 

Never forget to keep your first aid up to date if you own a pool. http://www.stjohnambulance.com.au/

 

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